FAMILY LAW

DIVORCE 

To file for divorce in New Jersey, you first have to meet the residency requirements. For all grounds for divorce, except for adultery, you or your spouse has to have lived in New Jersey for at least the last 12 consecutive months. It does not matter if you have lived in New Jersey your whole life. If you and the other party have resided outside of New Jersey at any point in the last 12 months, you will not be able to file for divorce until one or both of you has been here for the last 12 months.

 

If you do meet the residency requirements, you have to decide the appropriate venue for the divorce. Venue refers to where the case should be filed. In New Jersey, venue for the divorce is where the plaintiff lives, where the defendant lives or where the grounds for divorce (also known as the cause of action) first arose. For example, if you are filing for separation, you can file in the county where the separation first began, assuming you do not live there now. I always advise clients to file where they live or in whatever county previous cases between plaintiff and defendant (like custody or child support) have been filed.

 

What Type of Custody Can I Request?


Once your children have met the 6 month residency requirement, you can file for custody. The venue (where the case should be filed) for the filing is where the children have lived for the last 6 months. Once you have selected your venue, you have to decide what type of custody you are seeking. There are two types of custody-legal and residential. Legal custody refers to decision-making. More specifically, decisions regarding the health, welfare and education of the child (ren). Residential custody refers to where the children will be living.




What Does Visitation Look Like for Residential & Non-Residental Parents


Typically, there is one residential parent but both parents share legal custody. There may be situations where joint residential and joint legal or sole residential and sole legal may be more appropriate. If one parent is the residential parent, the other parent will be entitled to visitation. If the non-custodial parent (the parent the child does not live with) has a history of substance abuse, child abuse/neglect, mental health issues and/or violence, his or her visitation may be limited and/or supervised or there may be no visitation at all. Assuming that no such issues exist, the typical visitation (now known as parenting time) schedule is every other weekend, plus one night during the week with alternating holidays.




Can I Request A Modification to the Visitation Arrangement?


Regardless of the parenting time schedule that is set or the custodial arrangement ordered, the court can always modify same in the future. To do so, the party requesting the change has to prove that there has been a substantial change in either the custodian or child’s circumstances (for changes in custody) or in the non-custodial parent’s circumstances (for changes in visitation) such that the current arrangement is no longer in the child’s best interests. Because of the possibility of future changes, custody and visitation arrangements are never permanent.





DIVORCE F.A.Q. 

CHILD SUPPORT

In New Jersey, the person with residential custody of a child can receive child support. If the residential custodian is someone other than a parent, then a child support case can be opened against both parents. If the custodial parent is receiving cash assistance from the Board of Social Services (BOSS), then their right to child support is assigned to BOSS and BOSS will open and enforce the child support. If the child(ren) are in the care of DYFS, then both parents will be liable for paying child support to DYFS for whatever amount of time the child is under their care and supervision.

Regardless of where the children reside, child support will be enforced where the paying parent lives. It is often best therefore to open the child support case where the payer lives. If the payer lives out of state, the party requesting the support may be able to work with their local child support office to open an interstate child custody case.

 

WEB APP DEVELOPMENT BACKEND


-Microservice Architecture Backend in AWS: -AWS Step Functions, Lambda, Simple Notification Service (SNS) -Monolithic Architecture Backend in AWS: -EC2, EC2 Autoscaling & EC2 Load Balancer -Elastic Container Services and Register, Elastic Kubernetes Services -AWS DynamoDB & RDS -AWS CodeBuild, CodeCommit, CodeDeploy, CodePipeLine, CDK & CloudFormation -AWS CloudFront -Amazon Kinesis, Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka & Elasticsearch -AWS API Gateway -AWS Elastic Beanstalk -Amazon Cognito/Certificate Manager -Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) -Amazon CloudTrail




MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT BACKEND


-Same Backend as Web App Development Backend -Extra Services from AWS: -AWS Device Farm -Mobile Hub -Pinpoint -Cognito -Amplify -AppSync




DEVOPS


-AWS CodeBuild, CodeCommit, CodeDeploy, CodePipeLine -IaC with AWS CloudFormation, CDK & Hashicorp Terraform -Elastic Beanstalk -CloudWatch -Secrets Manager -Route 53 -S3 Glacier & Snowball -IoT




AUTOMATION TEST


-AWS Device Farm -AWS CodeBuild, CodeCommit, CodeDeploy, CodePipeLine & CDK -AWS CloudFormation -EC2, EC2 Autoscaling & EC2 Load Balancer -Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) -Relational Database Service RDS -Simple Email Service SES




MACHINE LEARNING


-Sage Maker -Kinesis -Comprehend -Translate -Polly -Transcribe -Lex -Rekognition -Forecast -Personalize -Freud Detector




DATA CENTER


-CONNECT -LEX -Pinpoint -Salesforce (and other CRMs) Integration





CHILD SUPPORT F.A.Q. 

CUSTODY FILING

In order to file for custody in New Jersey, the children must have resided in New Jersey for at least the last 6 consecutive months. There also cannot already be a custody or visitation order established in another state or jurisdiction. If there is already an order for custody or visitation from another state or jurisdiction, any requests for modification of that order have to be filed in that state or jurisdiction. 

custody-of-child_GJqikLDu.jpg
 

What Type of Custody Can I Request?


Once your children have met the 6 month residency requirement, you can file for custody. The venue (where the case should be filed) for the filing is where the children have lived for the last 6 months. Once you have selected your venue, you have to decide what type of custody you are seeking. There are two types of custody-legal and residential. Legal custody refers to decision-making. More specifically, decisions regarding the health, welfare and education of the child (ren). Residential custody refers to where the children will be living.




What Does Visitation Look Like for Residential & Non-Residental Parents


Typically, there is one residential parent but both parents share legal custody. There may be situations where joint residential and joint legal or sole residential and sole legal may be more appropriate. If one parent is the residential parent, the other parent will be entitled to visitation. If the non-custodial parent (the parent the child does not live with) has a history of substance abuse, child abuse/neglect, mental health issues and/or violence, his or her visitation may be limited and/or supervised or there may be no visitation at all. Assuming that no such issues exist, the typical visitation (now known as parenting time) schedule is every other weekend, plus one night during the week with alternating holidays.




Can I Request A Modification to the Visitation Arrangement?


Regardless of the parenting time schedule that is set or the custodial arrangement ordered, the court can always modify same in the future. To do so, the party requesting the change has to prove that there has been a substantial change in either the custodian or child’s circumstances (for changes in custody) or in the non-custodial parent’s circumstances (for changes in visitation) such that the current arrangement is no longer in the child’s best interests. Because of the possibility of future changes, custody and visitation arrangements are never permanent.





FILING FOR CUSTODY F.A.Q.